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20121201
20121231
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Book TV 13
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CSPAN2 13
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00pm EST
, that is such a poetic occupation. i can't believe nobody's written this. then i got to look and sound of the city had turned down any team than six times by an arsonist. i thought who is this guy? said basically in the true crime writer. that's what i would have to. and then i found out one of these firemen was tom sawyer who told -- i forgot his name, robinson of the call he'd run with first volunteer fire department in california and that was brodrick one. back in new york more tom was a runner, a porch boy coming it in the competition among brodrick came us to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. that's what his plan was. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the worlds ugliest man, have you a chance, murderous, gunslingers, conmen, just absolutely amazing people. i thought it got to write this. as i work in a release we are very close to it the tom sawyer met mark twain in may of 1863 about three blocks from here. the old thing in the same room. twain liked to talk to tom because tom movies free stories and they played cards and drink here matching
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 5:15pm EST
in the 1970s in "season of the witch: enchantment, terror and deliverance in the city of love." in "quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking," author susan cain examines the benefits of an introverted personality. david drayly looks at 1862 and the actions of abraham lincoln in "rise to greatness: abraham lincoln's most perilous year." and in "full body burden: growing up in the nuclear shadow of rocky flats," kristin iverson investigates the nuclear weapons plant that was located near her childhood home. for an extended list of links to various publications' book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or facebook.com/booktv. >> and another update from capitol hill as reporters wait here for word from lawmakerrers in closed-door meetings on the fiscal cliff. an update via twitter from chad pilgrim of fox news, reid's remark that he had made a counteroffer was off-the-cuff response and that there was no counteroffer, and "the washington post" quoting senator joe lieberman saying he'd be shocked if a deal was struck today. we'll bring you continuing updates
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
people. can you talk a little bit about how that works in a city? >> yeah. well, first of all, i've had lots of conversations with people who, quote-unquote, have made it, and when they were in tough times from famous people like tyler perry who was homeless, living in a car, to people i know throughout my community who have got, broken drug addictions, who have dealt with brutal, brutal hatred because they came out of the closet at a young age. all these stories. and it's amazing to me that everybody, including tyler perry, has these stories about how one perp's small act of -- one person's small act of kindness was a difference maker for them. and it gives me chills to think that the biggest thing we actually do on any given day probably could be a small act of kindness to someone else. and so the vulnerability and fragility of life you really get to see up close and personal in cities like ours here in new york and ours in newark, new jersey, and how it doesn't take that much effort to be there for a kid. and i see, and i was very happy during sandy, we were able to do some things th
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00am EST
. it was a big story. thiokol my staff. guess what i am doing? but it was a powerful thing. one of 14 cities in america with a food policy director and we had done a lot of work when trying to expand affordable health options. i said this is a great thing. we could not only raise levels of compassion and understanding and dispel that stereotypes about snap and things that are on snap and focusing ted -- focus instead on changes week could be making an t mobile level to address food and security and nutrition and expand more healthy options. that is what we are doing this week. we also have to think of our society as a whole. and security guards in my office, we were talking with them because some of them were making $7 and change and many working overtime to make more money to solve problems like snap, we are allowing many of our employees especially behind the curtains. the curtains blocked the sex and love section. it is like in 711, the line across the magazine's. you guys should put your book on the second aisle. >> we should have called it 50 shades of homelessness. >> it would have sol
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
anymore that we thought it had. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles tour go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now on booktv robert sullivan presents a history of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to discover -- discover that the cockpit, it's the kind of -- i mean you don't mention it in the book. but now we know that? added that escaped us? did you start out knowing that new jersey to markets see the entire revolution. >> someone reminded me, we lived in oregon for a lot of the 90's to my family. before i went to oregon i used to go have lunch all the time. i remember this now. i was very happy after i wrote the book. a bunch of guys who work toward guides gave me free passes to the top of the empire. and that was great. we spent lunch attack. kind of obvious, but it's a great view. and so -- >> really? >> really. really great deal. i just remember, remember as a kid reading about lincoln and and saying, you know, this was where it all happened. i know, and he was trying to get votes in new jersey. but he kept saying, i kno
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugur
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
, the city council of new york city had elections based on proportional representation so you would get a seat in the city council of new york if you got x% of the vote. if you got twice that you would get two seats which is how the following happened. amen named ben davis, benjamin davis won s c and city council of new york in the 1940s. you might be interested in two aspect of benjamin davis, city council member. he was black. he was an african-american and he was an enthusiastic public leader of the united states communist party and he was elected because of proportional representation. shortly after that proportional representation was ended. new democracy came in first, they had twenty-eight%. ari arizahad 24 or something close. under greek law whatever party comes in first gets not only the percentage of the popular vote that is won but an extra 50. that is the only reason there the government in greece now because they got it by this rule which is designed to favor the party that comes in first. you had a knife edge situation in greece. in addition to the sariza party their deep
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:15pm EST
places as well. in a times square in new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the s
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
a good grade to score well on the standardized exams they tried this in new york city, washington, d.c. and chicago. in dallas they tried offering second graders to dollars for each book they read it's a promising idea that people are not very happy about it but let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion to the if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many things it is a good idea worth trying and how many of you would object in principle? let's see first how many of you would object? how many of you would not like this idea? quite a few. and how many think that it's worth trying? all right we have a pretty good division of opinion. let's begin by those that object. who was willing to explain to offer your reason why do you think this would be objectionable in principle? and who will start us off? yes, stand up and we will get you a microphone. >> go ahead. >> i would object because there is a basic value in learning and a basic excitement about learning new things if you start paying for
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
bailed out new york city. it goes back a long time. so to get the resolution authority that failed to separate out this is something that is easy. i don't have a solution. >> we have a question. do you agree with angela merkel insistence on an austerity for greece, spain, italy? >> austerity? yes. there is no way you can do without problem with those various sponsors and sustainably go with the quid pro quo. but to do that to maintain austerity to be bailed out. over the indefinite period. this is where the rubber hits the road. where you need very disciplined policies and willingness to lend on the part of the creditors. they don't trust the borrowers who do not trust but they do for a few months. [inaudible] then a few months later so a little more discipline and a little more money. they said the vote provide the my a plan. but behind all of this side believe there is the enormous sense of commitment probably just in the part of the republic. i almost cannot imagine. and what would happen under this situation in? but with the conviction we've tried hour best but traditionally yo
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
. at the end of that first week, new york city came to him and said, 'mr. morgan, we can't meet our payroll obligations and we're gonna be bankrupt by monday.' and he managed to manufacture $100 million of clearinghouse certificates that essentially kept new york city going through the weekend. c-span: how much... >> guest: it's an amazing story. c-span: ... how much money was he worth when he died at 75 years? >> guest: approximately $80 million. that's a little low, because it was for estate --valued for estate purposes. there was no federal estate tax at the time, but there was a new york state inheritance tax. but it was under $100 million. c-span: how much is that worth today? >> guest: well, you have to multiply by 15 or 20. so if we say it's a $100 million, it would be about $1.5 million to $3 billion. and so it was a lot of money, but not nearly as much as people imagined and not as much as other wealthy men at the time had. morgan had bought out andrew carnegie when he put together us steel in 1901, for $480 million, which carnegie personally got half, so $240 million in 1901. morg
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13